The museum blog

The battles

After the landing of the Allied troops in Normandy, the Germans quickly went up from the south to the northwest in an attempt to block their progress. This movement will give rise to major and bloody operations and battles on Lower Normandy soil. It will be the battle of the hedges (Hedgerows hell), Operation Cobra or even Mortain’s counter-attack … besides that, the daily clashes will also leave traces.

The hedgerow Hell, one of the Greatest Battles in History

The hedgerow Hell, one of the Greatest Battles in History

The summer of 1944 witnessed terrible clashes between the US military and the German army in Normandy. For 11 weeks, in the Cotentin, then in the center and in the south of the Manche, the American army, led by General Eisenhower, fought hard against the troops of the Reich. The staff’s objective is to liberate Normandy and move towards Brittany and Mayenne, then towards eastern France. Sadly, nothing is going to turn out the way the Allies expected.

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June 17, 1940, in La Manche …

June 17, 1940, in La Manche …

As the 7th German division commanded by Rommel, inexorably advances towards Cherbourg and as the war draws near to La Manche, a handful of diehards cling to the lines of defense in Le Cotentin and try to halt the dazzling advance of the enemy.

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Other posts that might interest you

The Weasel M29, a WWII all-terrain vehicle

The Weasel M29, a WWII all-terrain vehicle

The Normandy Victory Museum presents a rather unusual American army vehicle in its permanent exhibition. This is the Weasel, also known as the M29 Weasel Tracked Cargo Carrier. We invite you to learn more about this Swiss army knife-like vehicle that found its place during the Battle of Normandy.

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